By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #FeatureFriday, Feature Stories

Antonino Rangel Alvarez (or Antonio, as everyone calls him) is celebrating his 15-year anniversary with Myatt Landscaping this week! Antonino started out as a laborer when he heard about the job from a friend. He worked his way up to Crew Leader in... read more.

By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #TeachingTuesday

There are several species of hydrangea used in landscaping, but today we are talking about Hydrangea macrophylla, also known as bigleaf hydrangea. There are two main groups of bigleaf hydrangeas, the mopheads, which have large round masses of flowers,... read more.

By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #TeachingTuesday

Based on 126 years of statewide average rainfall data, 2020 was the second wettest year on record, with 2018 being the wettest. 2021 has just gotten started, but it looks like we may be in for another record-breaking year in terms of heat and... read more.

By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #FeatureFriday, Feature Stories

As of Sunday, Feb 7, Chris Eakins will have been with Myatt Landscaping for 20 years. He has been friends with Scott and Todd Myatt since before they started the company, and was working in manufacturing when the company he worked for shifted... read more.

By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #TeachingTuesday

Ilex verticillata, or winterberry holly, is a deciduous holly native the eastern United States. Unlike most hollies, it drops all of its leaves in the fall/winter, revealing stems covered with clusters of bright red berries. In nature, the... read more.

By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #TeachingTuesday

Acer saccharum, the sugar maple, is a large deciduous tree native to eastern and central North America. These are the same trees that produce maple syrup farther north, but unfortunately the weather isn’t cold enough in NC to produce... read more.

By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #TeachingTuesday

Ginkgo is a very unusual tree. It is considered a “living fossil” because the tree that is living today is almost exactly the same as it was 200 million years ago, during the Jurassic period. It is thought that the fruit was originally... read more.

By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #TeachingTuesday

 Tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) is a large, native, deciduous tree. It is also referred to as tulip tree, or yellow poplar. The straight species, meaning the one found in the wild, can grow 60 to 90 feet tall, with a spread of 30... read more.

By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #TeachingTuesday

This week’s plant of the week is the Japanese flowering cherry tree. Flowering cherries look beautiful when blooming in the spring, but can look messy at other times in the year. The most common ornamental cherry trees in the landscape are... read more.

By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #TeachingTuesday

This week, we’re focusing on gardenia, also known as cape jasmine. The scientific name is Gardenia jasminoides. The genus name honors Alexander Garden (1730-1791), a Scottish physician, botanist and zoologist who settled in Charleston,... read more.

By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #TeachingTuesday

This week, our plant is American arborvitae, or Thuja occidentalis. American arborvitae is a slender, evergreen tree native to eastern North America. It has a broad pyramidal shape, and rich green summer color. The most common cultivar is... read more.

By Myatt Landscaping, Posted in #TeachingTuesday

This week, our plant is Swamp Sunflower, or Helianthus angustifolius. It’s a large, native, herbaceous perennial that grows to about 6 feet tall every year from the ground up. It blooms in the late fall, making it one of the last... read more.